THE PROBLEM WITH FOAM

JOIN US IN THE CAMPAIGN AGAINST FOAM TABLEWARE

IT TAKES GENERATIONS FOR FOAM TO DECOMPOSE

Nearly 25 billion foam cups are thrown in landfills in the US alone. In today’s markets, these cups are not viably recyclable and end up filling landfills where they are trapped for an indefinite period without any degradation. Foam is an expanded polystyrene product (or EPS).  Most EPS and Polystyrene (PS) products will not biodegrade and infact can be inert in certain landfill conditions for millions of years.

SAY NO TO FOAM AND USE COMPOSTABLE OR
RECYCLABLE FOOD SERVING PRODUCTS. 

BE PART OF THE SOLUTION

THE PROBLEM

FOAM IS EXTREMELY EFFICIENT
Foam is 95% air, making it light and very inexpensive, which makes it a difficult choice to replace, as most alternatives are more expensive and heavier. This makes transitioning to degradable products a greater challenge.

LANDFILLS AND ZERO WASTE STRATEGIES
Many cities have enacted goals of becoming zero waste. Meaning all waste will one day be either recycled, reused or composted. Foam and other related Polystyrene Products (such as foam plates) need to be replaced with biodegradable products that can be recycled or composted. Currently there are no viable options to recycle foam.

OUR OCEANS
Cups, straws and plastics in our storm drains and water works end up in the ocean and along with other beach waste break down into smaller plastics. It is lightweight and buoyant so it stays afloat and breaks down in the oceans currents and marine life mistakenly eat it as food. It is possible that the pollutants may never degrade as it travels up the food chain.

OUR HEALTH
The building components of EPS and PS are Styrene and Benzene, both known carcinogens. According to United States Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), National Toxicology Program (NTP) styrene is listed as “reasonably anticipated to be a human carcinogen”. The plates and cups you eat and drink from may not be safe for the consumption of food or drink.

OUR SOLUTION

Our solution is to provide the community with the benefits of compostable food serving products like food plates and packaging made from Plant Based materials.

BAGASSE (SUGAR CANE-BASED TABLEWARE)

Bagasse is the dry pulpy residue left after the extraction of juice from sugar cane, it is then used to create tableware.

  • Typical decomposition of bagasse in soil or compost is about 60 days
  • Comes from a renewable and sustainable, fast growing plant source
  • Can be sent to composting, or in cases like the City of Surrey, to a state-of-the-art Biofuel facility to be converted to Biofuel

Sugarcane, the sustainable option

Sugarcane (or similar compostable and sustainable) products decompose in approximately 3-6 months. Sugarcane stalk can be regrown every year, which makes it a better and more sustainable option compared to paper plates from trees which take years to regrow and replenish. 

Go Foam Free with us!

info@gofoamfree.com